A | A | A
Norske sider >
Trygve Slagsvbold Vedum, Minister of Agriculture and Food. 
Photo: Torbjørn Tandberg.Trygve Slagsvbold Vedum, Minister of Agriculture and Food. Photo: Torbjørn Tandberg

Changes in Norwegian border protection for selected agricultural products

Last updated: 03.07.2013 // The Norwegian switch to ad valorem duties for six tariff lines is a measure in order to maintain a viable Norwegian agriculture for the future. The changes are fully consistent with Norway´s international trade commitments.

Norway has since 1995 had the right to choose between specific duties or ad valorem duties for all important agricultural products, that is 48 % of all tariff lines. From the outset in 1995, Norway decided to use specific duties for nearly all tariff lines. Parliament, however, noted in 1995, that a change to ad valorem duties was foreseen if border protection with specific duties proved insufficient or for other reasons.

The maximum import duties are passed by the Norwegian Parliament for each calendar year. There have been a few changes to ad valorem duties in recent years, notably the change for three tariff lines comprising fluid milk from January 2011.

The Norwegian state budget for 2013 contains a change to ad valorem duties for six tariff lines, two for beef steaks and fillets, two for lamb carcasses or half carcasses and two for hard or semi hard cheeses. In total Norway applies roughly 1350 tariff lines at eight digit level.

The changes are fully consistent with Norway´s international trade commitments.

The consequences of the Norwegian switch to ad valorem duties for existing trade between the EU and Norway are explained below. It is important to remember that the change only influences trade at full duties.

Cheese
Norway has switched to ad valorem duties for two tariff lines for hard and semi hard cheeses. In these two tariff lines roughly 330 tons were imported with full duties in 2012. In addition, 1230 tons of these cheeses were imported inside the duty free quota of 7200 tons. This duty free quota was increased by 2700 tons from 1. January 2012. Total imports of cheese from the EU increased by 4,5 % in 2012. Current import data indicate a similar increase in 2013.

In 2013 the importers will place the 330 tons inside the duty free quota. Consequently, there will be no increase in duties for existing cheese trade from the EU to Norway. No current cheese imports will be hit by ad valorem duties.

The switch to ad valorem duties is important for the future possibility to increase domestic cheese prices in Norway.

Beef
Norway has switched to ad valorem duties for two tariff lines including beef steaks and fillets. The actual import in 2012 at full duties from the European Union was 35 tons, and the value of the imports was 4,4 million NOK.

This is less than 0,3 % of the total imports of beef from the EU to Norway. The total imports increased by 124 % in 2012 up to 12600 tons. More than 99 % of the imports entered Norway at reduced import duties.

Lamb meat
Norway has switched to ad valorem duties for two tariff lines for lamb meat. The actual import in 2012 at full duties from the European Union was 20 tons, and the value of the imports was 0,8 million NOK.

This is only 1,1 % of the total imports of lamb meat from the EU to Norway. The total imports increased by 186 % in 2012 up to 1810 tons. Roughly 99 % of the imports entered Norway at reduced import duties.

The Norwegian switch to ad valorem duties for six tariff lines is a measure in order to maintain a viable Norwegian agriculture for the future. As described, it has a very limited impact on existing agricultural trade from the European Union - a trade that continued to increase also in 2012. Norwegian import of agricultural products from EU has increased by more than 150 % during the last decade.

 

 

 


Bookmark and Share