Erna Solberg, Prime Minister of Norway met with Donald Tusk, President of the European Council in Brussels in January 2015. 
Photo: Juha Roininen, EUP Images/SMK.Erna Solberg, Prime Minister of Norway met with Donald Tusk, President of the European Council in Brussels in January 2015. Photo: Juha Roininen, EUP Images/SMK

Norway and the European Union

Last updated: 10.03.2015 // Norway and the EU enjoy good and close relations, although Norway is not a member of the European Union. The Agreement on the European Economic Area (EEA) is the mainstay of our cooperation, and it ensures that Norway takes part in the EU internal market. We are also part of the Schengen Agreement and cooperate with the EU on foreign and security policy issues.


See also:

The Norwegian Government's Strategy for cooperation with the EU 2014 - 2017
The Government's Work Programme for Cooperation with the EU 2015 (pdf)
Brochure: Norway and the EU - partners for Europe (pdf)


Through the EEA Agreement, the three EFTA states Norway, Iceland and Liechtenstein are equal partners in the EU internal market, on the same terms as the EU member states. This includes having access to the internal market’s four freedoms: the free movement of goods, persons, services and capital.

The EEA Agreement is the most far-reaching economic agreement Norway has entered into, and by far the single most important agreement regulating the relationship between Norway and the EU. In fact, over 80 per cent of our exports go to the EU, and more than 60 per cent of our imports come from EU countries.

Moreover, the Agreement also covers cooperation in other important areas such as research and development, education, social policy, the environment, consumer protection, tourism and culture. It also enables the three EEA EFTA states to participate in various EU programmes. Norway also participates in the activities of a number of EU agencies through provisions in the EEA Agreement or on the basis of bilateral agreements.

Norway and the EU also cooperate extensively in the field of justice and home affairs, for instance through the Schengen Agreement. Energy and climate, fisheries, maritime affairs, research and education are other important areas of cooperation. When it comes to foreign and security policy, Norway is engaged in a substantial policy dialogue with the EU, primarily with the European External Action Service (EEAS).

Norway shares a common set of values with the EU and its member states, and we are working together to find joint solutions to common challenges. on www.eu-norway.org you will find information about the areas in which Norway and the EU cooperate, and the extent of our cooperation. The scope and depth of our relations may surprise you.


 


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