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Photo: Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries.Photo: Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries

Fisheries and Maritime Affairs

Last updated: 21.03.2016 // Norway is a seafaring nation, with much of its population living along the coast and depending on the sea, whether in the areas of fisheries, energy or shipping. Norway and the EU share the ambition of maintaining the European maritime industries’ world-leading position and competitiveness. EU legislation in the maritime area also applies to Norway, through the EEA Agreement.

Fisheries

Norway is one of the world’s largest exporters of fish. Around 65 % of total Norwegian seafood exports go to the EU. A protocol to the EEA Agreement regulates trade between Norway and the EU in the area of fish and seafood.

Management of living marine resources is not included in the EEA Agreement itself, but Norwegian and EU fishing vessels harvest fish and seafood from the same oceans. Taking as their basis a separate framework agreement, Norway and the EU negotiate annual quota agreements on joint stocks in the North Sea, as well as quota exchanges for stocks in other sea areas.

In general, Norway and the EU cooperate closely on the management of marine resources, including on the monitoring and enforcement of regulations. Common efforts to combat the problem of illegal, unreported and unregulated fishing (IUU) have produced encouraging results.

Furthermore, Norway cooperates closely with the EU on resource management and protection of the marine environment. Norway participates in relevant EU programmes and acts as a partner in the development of European marine policies.

Maritime Affairs

Norway is a seafaring nation, with much of its population living along the coast and depending on the sea, whether in the areas of fisheries, energy or shipping. Norway and the EU share the ambition of maintaining the European maritime industries’ world-leading position and competitiveness.  EU legislation in the maritime area also applies to Norway, through the EEA Agreement.

In order to maintain and develop a world leading maritime transport industry in Europe, it is essential to provide stable, predictable and competitive framework conditions, based on high international standards for safety, environment, skills and labour conditions. The presence of shipping companies in Europe, the use of European shipping registers and European seafaring competencies are key elements in this respect.  Promotion of short sea shipping and world-class maritime research and innovation are also essential in the development of the European maritime transport industry.

An integrated approach to ocean management and maritime affairs, as represented by the EU maritime policy, is in line with Norwegian thinking and policy. This is confirmed by the government’s maritime strategy “Maritime Opportunities – Blue Growth for a Green Future

Norway took active part in the process when the EU maritime transport strategy was developed in 2009/10 and contributed to the mid-term review in process inter alia through the adoption of the Athens declaration as well in several “Directors meetings”, where initial views and input to the mid-term review process has been conveyed.

More information:
Document: The Norwegian Government's Strategy for cooperation with the EU 2014 - 2017
Website: EEA Policy Areas on www.efta.int
Website: Ministry of Trade, Industry and Fisheries


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